Ukrainian refugees are stunned by a contact of house in Brazilian haven : Goats and Soda : NPR

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Ukrainian refugees are stunned by a contact of house in Brazilian haven : Goats and Soda : NPR 1

Laryssa Moskvichova and her youngsters fled the battle in Ukraine 3 months in the past and resettled in Prudentópolis, a Brazilian city based by Ukrainians. She’s been baking and promoting Ukrainian specialties in her new house — just like the oreshki on the plate. It is a walnut-shaped cookie full of doce de leite. The markers belong to her 6-year-old daughter, who had simply been coloring.

Gabriela Portilho for NPR


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Gabriela Portilho for NPR


Laryssa Moskvichova and her youngsters fled the battle in Ukraine 3 months in the past and resettled in Prudentópolis, a Brazilian city based by Ukrainians. She’s been baking and promoting Ukrainian specialties in her new house — just like the oreshki on the plate. It is a walnut-shaped cookie full of doce de leite. The markers belong to her 6-year-old daughter, who had simply been coloring.

Gabriela Portilho for NPR

Laryssa Moskvichova simply crammed her greatest order but. It took 4 days to make round 360 oreshki, a walnut-shaped cookie full of doce de leite, a caramelized condensed milk related to Latin America but in addition utilized in Ukraine.

The recipe she introduced along with her from Ukraine is a favourite of consumers in her new house of Prudentópolis, a small city in southern Brazil the place she fled along with her three daughters — Anastasiia Ivanova, 22, Sofiia Moskvichova, 14, and Ruslana Moskvichova, 6 — when the battle at house grew to become an excessive amount of. ( Like different Ukrainian males between the ages of 18 and 60, Laryssa’s husband — the daddy of her two youngest daughters — needed to keep behind when his household fled.)

Orders have been rolling in at a tempo Laryssa by no means anticipated. At this time she’s engaged on buckwheat bread and prepping for an additional spherical of oreshki tomorrow. Within the days to come back, there shall be apple pies, honey muffins, vareniki dumplings and extra oreshki.

Laryssa Moskvichova bakes oreshkis, a Ukrainian cookie. She’s getting quite a lot of orders for Ukrainian baked items in her new house in Brazil. When she lived in Ukraine, Laryssa earned a dwelling by promoting toys and parrots and parakeets from her house.

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Gabriela Portilho for NPR


Laryssa Moskvichova bakes oreshkis, a Ukrainian cookie. She’s getting quite a lot of orders for Ukrainian baked items in her new house in Brazil. When she lived in Ukraine, Laryssa earned a dwelling by promoting toys and parrots and parakeets from her house.

Gabriela Portilho for NPR

As she kneads the dough for her final loaf of bread and locations it right into a pan lined with parchment paper, the afternoon solar streaming by means of the sliding glass doorways resulting in the balcony of her fourth-floor residence, she calls her new pal Andreia Burko Bley, who grew up on this city and has sons the identical age as her two youngest daughters.

They speak about Andreia taking the women to highschool the subsequent day and the menu she made to assist Laryssa’s baking enterprise, which she and her husband, Paulo Bley, have been circulating on WhatsApp.

It is a simple dialog, full of laughter and the sort of chatter that often solely comes with years of friendship.

However in truth, the 2 girls solely simply met in early June.

Andreia is certainly one of many natives of the Brazilian city who discovered Ukrainian earlier than she discovered Portuguese. Her great-grandparents have been among the many first households some 116 years in the past to come back from Ukraine and settle Prudentópolis, named for a previous president of Brazil and now often known as “Little Ukraine,” with the hopes of constructing a dwelling by farming the obtainable land.

The Ukrainian-Brazilian People Dance Group Vesselka was based in 1958 and performs all year long — and even travels overseas. Above: a rehearsal of their house base of Prudentópolis.

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The Ukrainian-Brazilian People Dance Group Vesselka was based in 1958 and performs all year long — and even travels overseas. Above: a rehearsal of their house base of Prudentópolis.

Gabriela Portilho for NPR

This surprising hub of Ukrainian tradition has turn into a haven for eight households who escaped the battle within the final six months with the assistance of a worldwide community of evangelical church buildings. Its ties to house present not solely a way of consolation to these like Laryssa and her daughters but in addition deep connection to those that stay there and a bond that may’t be damaged, even when they’ll, someday, go house.

Ukrainian refugee Anastasiia Ivanova reads the Bible on the terrace of the residence in Prudentópolis, Brazil, the place she now lives along with her mom and siblings. The religious 22-year-old says her religion is what’s helped her get by means of all of her trials. She introduced her Bible along with her when the household fled Kharkiv.

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Gabriela Portilho for NPR


Ukrainian refugee Anastasiia Ivanova reads the Bible on the terrace of the residence in Prudentópolis, Brazil, the place she now lives along with her mom and siblings. The religious 22-year-old says her religion is what’s helped her get by means of all of her trials. She introduced her Bible along with her when the household fled Kharkiv.

Gabriela Portilho for NPR

From concern in Kharkiv to pizza (with a fork) in Prudentópolis

Three pizza containers are stacked within the heart of Andreia and Paulo’s eating desk. Bruno and Ruslana, classmates on the close by elementary college, giggle as they take turns swinging a plastic sword at one another within the adjoining front room, the scent of melted cheese and tomato sauce wafting by means of the air.

Their moms chat as they get plates and cups from the kitchen cabinets, and Paulo does his greatest to speak to Sofiia. When the few Ukrainian phrases he has picked up within the final couple months and slowly spoken Portuguese do not work, he turns to Google Translate for assist. He did not develop up right here and isn’t of Ukrainian heritage like his spouse, so he is studying as he goes.

Relating to pizza, Paulo Bley of Prudentópolis and his two sons have a distinction of opinion with their Ukrainian tablemates. The Brazilians use a fork. The Ukrainians most actually don’t!

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Gabriela Portilho for NPR


Relating to pizza, Paulo Bley of Prudentópolis and his two sons have a distinction of opinion with their Ukrainian tablemates. The Brazilians use a fork. The Ukrainians most actually don’t!

Gabriela Portilho for NPR

The chatter among the many eight — in Ukrainian, Russian, Portuguese and English — continues as all of them settle in across the desk. Andreia locations utensils subsequent to the spherical cardboard containers. Sofiia offers a mushy chuckle on the considered consuming pizza with a fork and knife. It is likely to be the norm in Brazil however not in Ukraine. She folds her slice in half earlier than taking a chunk.

Fun over a sizzling meal was unimaginable for the 14-year-old and her household just some months in the past. When bombs began falling from the sky over Chilly Mountain, the Kharkiv neighborhood the place they lived, the household hid in Anastasiia’s room — on the heart of their duplex, it did not have any home windows — for per week. When the bombs bought so shut they destroyed a college the women as soon as attended, they moved right down to the cellar, an area so small they could not lay down.

However the Ukrainian winter was too harsh and after two days of temperatures as little as -22° Fahrenheit, Laryssa knew they needed to go away.

“It was actually troublesome,” she says. “I needed to go away my house behind. It was all we had. We had half an hour to seize all the pieces we might, pack our luggage and run. All I might consider have been my women. I bought all of their issues and forgot about myself. I did not even take my garments.”

Anastasiia Ivanova exhibits pictures of her house metropolis of Kharkiv on her telephone, depicting the destruction in the course of the Russian invasion that started on Feb. 24.

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Anastasiia Ivanova exhibits pictures of her house metropolis of Kharkiv on her telephone, depicting the destruction in the course of the Russian invasion that started on Feb. 24.

Gabriela Portilho for NPR

They piled into their automobile and headed towards Poltava, a vacation spot for a lot of since combating hadn’t but reached the town, giving them time to resolve the place to go subsequent. Throughout the 20-hour journey — it ought to have lasted not more than two, however the mass exodus meant site visitors was bumper-to-bumper — a pal of Anastasiia’s known as and advisable they get in contact with a pastor in Poltava from the identical church they attended in Kharkiv, Phrase of Life. He was a part of the International Kingdom Partnership Community (GKPN), a gaggle of evangelical pastors discovering secure locations all over the world for Ukrainian households to start out over.

Days later, when he despatched a message over WhatsApp asking who wished to go to Brazil, Laryssa’s response was speedy.

“The very first thing I assumed was, no, I am not going to Brazil,” she says. “I do not know anybody in Brazil, I do not know something about it. What’s even there?”

However her religion that God would information her and a dream she had the place she was flying over the ocean made her change her thoughts. The household launched into a journey that might take them to Lviv, Warsaw and Frankfurt earlier than boarding a aircraft to Brazil.

When she first arrived in São Paulo along with her women — a visit paid for by the church — Laryssa had no thought she would find yourself in Prudentópolis. The 4 spent per week at a church-owned farm outdoors Curitiba, the capital metropolis of Paraná state, earlier than Pastor Vitalii Arshulik, from the First Baptist Church of Prudentópolis and a member of the GKPN, helped set them up in a totally furnished residence with a stocked fridge, made doable with donations from the neighborhood. The church can also be serving to the households who’ve come to Prudentópolis and neighboring cities with psychological well being help, language lessons, job-hunting assist and cash to pay payments, together with hire, for his or her first 12 months in Brazil.

“We really feel pleased to have the ability to assist, to have the ability to do one thing for our Ukrainian brothers and sisters,” says the pastor, who got here to Brazil along with his spouse and kids 5 years in the past to go up the native Baptist church. “It was essential for us to welcome them.”

Pastor Vitalii Arshulik got here to Prudentópolis from Ukraine 5 years in the past to steer the native Baptist church, bringing his spouse, Iryna, and their youngsters. The pastor has helped make the 8 newly arrived refugee households really feel at house: “It was essential for us to welcome them.”

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Pastor Vitalii Arshulik got here to Prudentópolis from Ukraine 5 years in the past to steer the native Baptist church, bringing his spouse, Iryna, and their youngsters. The pastor has helped make the 8 newly arrived refugee households really feel at house: “It was essential for us to welcome them.”

Gabriela Portilho for NPR

A brand new faraway house seems to be rather a lot like Ukraine

For Laryssa and her daughters, the connection between their new house and their outdated one was a shock. They did not anticipate finding conventional brightly coloured picket Ukrainian homes and church buildings with cupolas, a robust satisfaction in Ukrainian dance, music and artwork — like embroidery and the intricate designs of pysanka Easter eggs, two mediums that Andreia nonetheless practices immediately after studying them from her grandmother as a baby — and their language spoken within the streets of the Brazilian city of 52,000.

“I by no means thought that in Brazil, throughout the ocean, folks would communicate Ukrainian,” says Anastasiia. “It is a miracle.”

Gustavo Hull has danced within the Ukrainian-Brazilian Vesselka Folklore Group since he was 7. The dancers put on conventional Ukrainian clothes. At proper: the Ukrainian heritage of residents of Prudentópolis is showcased of their hand-painted Easter eggs. City resident Andreia Burko Bley likes to make the eggs for herself and to offer as items. Others promote them to vacationers.

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Gustavo Hull has danced within the Ukrainian-Brazilian Vesselka Folklore Group since he was 7. The dancers put on conventional Ukrainian clothes. At proper: the Ukrainian heritage of residents of Prudentópolis is showcased of their hand-painted Easter eggs. City resident Andreia Burko Bley likes to make the eggs for herself and to offer as items. Others promote them to vacationers.

Gabriela Portilho for NPR

Sofiia and Ruslana have been shortly enrolled in class, whereas Laryssa and Anastasiia set to work organizing their new house. They discovered solace in church and the kindness they acquired from neighbors, each Ukrainian and Brazilian.

However it wasn’t till they have been befriended by Andreia and Paulo that they really felt that they had discovered their place.

Laryssa and Andreia met throughout college pickup after Andreia’s 6-year-old, Bruno, insisted she meet Ruslana’s mother. He was positive they’d be quick mates, since his mother’s first language was Ukrainian too.

College students leaving college in Prudentópolis. Within the background are the Nossa Senhora do Patrocínio Church and the cemetery. The church, constructed within the mid-Twenties, showcases the Byzantine structure typical of church buildings in Ukraine.

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College students leaving college in Prudentópolis. Within the background are the Nossa Senhora do Patrocínio Church and the cemetery. The church, constructed within the mid-Twenties, showcases the Byzantine structure typical of church buildings in Ukraine.

Gabriela Portilho for NPR

The Ukrainian spoken in Prudentópolis is barely completely different than what’s spoken in Ukraine immediately — an older model of the language that was dropped at the city over 100 years in the past and by no means modified — however that did not cease Bruno’s prediction from coming true.

The 2 girls shortly grew to become shut, and their households adopted swimsuit. Andreia began driving Ruslana and Sofiia to highschool so they would not should stroll, and she or he and Paulo helped promote Laryssa’s baking enterprise and set her up with the fundamental elements she wanted to get began. Earlier than coming to Brazil the mother of three was already an entrepreneur, operating her personal on-line toy retailer and a enterprise promoting pet parrots and parakeets.

Andreia Burko Bley of Brazil (proper) is of Ukrainian descent, shares a meal along with her new pal, Ukrainian refugee Laryssa Moskvichova. The 2 girls solely met in June and have turn into shut mates. Their households eat collectively typically. Laryssa brings recent baked Ukrainian items. Andreia and her husband, Paulo, make sure that the favourite meals of Laryssa’s youngsters are on the desk.

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Gabriela Portilho for NPR


Andreia Burko Bley of Brazil (proper) is of Ukrainian descent, shares a meal along with her new pal, Ukrainian refugee Laryssa Moskvichova. The 2 girls solely met in June and have turn into shut mates. Their households eat collectively typically. Laryssa brings recent baked Ukrainian items. Andreia and her husband, Paulo, make sure that the favourite meals of Laryssa’s youngsters are on the desk.

Gabriela Portilho for NPR

When Paulo seen that Sofiia, the quietest of the household and an avid painter, had a telephone case with Vincent van Gogh’s “The Starry Night time,” he gave her his sweatshirt with the portray replicated throughout the entrance.

“Their hearts are so massive,” says Anastasiia. “In Ukraine we did not have mates like this. They’re very caring folks.”

For Andreia and Paulo, what they’ve acquired is a lot greater than what they’ve given.

“I by no means imagined it could be like this,” says Andreia of her relationship with Laryssa’s household, “that it could maintain this cultural, emotional and non secular weight.”

As Laryssa stands on the black stone counter of her kitchen, dusting an order of oreshki with powdered sugar earlier than packaging it to be picked up, she sighs.

She by no means imagined she would even go to Brazil, however now, due to one thing so simple as kindness, it is beginning to really feel like house.

Jill Langlois is an unbiased journalist primarily based in São Paulo, Brazil. She has been freelancing from the biggest metropolis within the western hemisphere since 2010, writing and reporting for publications like Nationwide Geographic, The New York Occasions, The Guardian and Time. Her work focuses on human rights, the surroundings and the impression of socioeconomic points on folks’s lives.

Gabriela Portilho is a documentary photographer and journalist whose work investigates the connection between human beings and their communities, specializing in environmental and gender points. A member of Women Photograph and Native Company, she lives in Paraty, a small metropolis between São Paulo and Rio de Janeiro.

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